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Forgotten Cask Cognac

By Joe Ruvel · December 15th, 2011 · Comments Off

Had a sip of cognac last night at 83 Proof from a bottle from the Forgotten Cask program. They custom blend with various people and companies a bunch of very old small lots of cognac.  You might be drinking a tiny bit of a 1920′s cognac!  The taste I had was killer – rich, complex, a little spicy. I don’t know which blend we had – but my guess is The Forgotten Casks Cognac Vat 48 which is available at K&L.

Here is a few year old video with one of the master blenders:

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Comments OffTags: Non-Beer Beverages · Tastings

Old cans

By Joe Ruvel · December 13th, 2011 · Comments Off

Pretty cool cans found under my cousins rental house. Love the tag line for the Sprite – “It’s a natural!”

From my cousin:

“Found this in or under the house. They are older than me!!!! The Coke can has a special offer with expiration date of November 30, 1971. Almost a year older than me!”

Comments OffTags: Non-Beer Beverages

Why Kirsch?

By Jasmine · December 12th, 2011 · Comments Off

Among the many questions I start getting at work as we near the holidays is: do you sell kirsch? So you’re making fondue. My answer is generally to lead them to the best Gruyere, a bit of cheddar, and some sort of lovely stinky cheese, because truly excellent cheese is more important than any other ingredient in your fondue. It makes up 95% of what’s in your pot, so spend 95% of your time and money on it.

Then when pressed, I admit I really have no idea what kirsch is (other than it must involve cherries) or where to get it. Every time I’ve made fondue I just use beer or white wine.

Kirsch is a cherry brandy, NOT a cherry liqueur. It is generally made with tart, not sweet cherries, and aged in barrels to add a woody flavor. The important lesson in all this is that it is something that adds a tart bite, NOT sweetness. So don’t substitute any old fruity liqueur or maraschino cherry juice if you decide not to buy a whole bottle of this hard to find and esoteric ingredient.

The main reason for adding kirsch is if you are using bland or underripe cheese. The acid is there to enhance the flavor, the same way a bit of lemon juice zips up a boring salad or pasta. If you omit it and just use good ripe or sharp cheese, your fondue will be lovely. If you’d like to add something as a substitute, use an especially tart white wine like a Sancerre or add a splash of a sour beer (I would mix it with a tamer beer like an IPA, unless you find one that’s just a little bit sour. Petrus sounds like a likely candidate to me).

sour sunday 014

Our friends are having their second annual fondue and bad Christmas movie night this weekend–maybe I’ll try to test the sour beer theory and get back to you.

Comments OffTags: Beer & Food

Getting ready for the holiday party

By Joe Ruvel · December 10th, 2011 · Comments Off

The top row of the fridge…all beer

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and the keg has been delivered

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Can you tell I am excited? And it is only 9:15 in the morning.

Happy Holidays everyone!

Comments OffTags: General

Not my new house

By Joe Ruvel · December 8th, 2011 · 1 Comment

I have thought this over…and finally decided I will not be buying the Coors mansion.

Extreme Pricechopper: Presidio Heights Mansion Built by Beer Loses its Foamy Head (from curbed)

(Image from unofficialnetworks.com)

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